Twelfth Night or a look into the future

 Granted, when winter solstice is finally over on the 22nd of December, it does not look like spring is just around the corner for a long time.

Due to our plante not really circling round the sun, but performing a rather ellipsodial movement, the fact that the nights are now getting shorter again and we can celebrate longer and lighter days, happens ever so slightly, there is practically no observable difference to the days before.

But we all know it does happen. The return of the sun, the resurrection of nature under layers of snow, the beginning of new life, it is all there.

It comes as no surprise that most cultures living under the northern hemisphere, who are far enough north to experience winter as a period of much darker months, celebrate winter solstice in some way or other. And all of them see this time of the year as a time when the gates between the world of the living and the world of the spirits are exceptionally thin or even open.

 

The Wild Hunt is one of those sagas, with Herne the Hunter and his companions riding through the kies in a battle of the light against the dark.

 

The Romans did the whole Calendar thing differently, their year begins with spring, hence the months of September to December bearing names that have little to do with when they appear in a „modern“ Western calendar. Septem, Oktem, Novem and Decem mean nothing more but seven, eight, nine and ten, which makes perfect sense in a calendar year beginning with March, when spring is really just around the corner. January, however, is named after the Janus, the two-faced God with one face looking back to the old and the other looking forward to the new.

The birth of Jesus, as the bringer of light and warmth in the darkest of times, was obviously re-scheduled to this time, so theta the twelve nights, when the world of the spirits is closest,, also known as Twelfth Night, begins with Christmas eve and ends on Epiphany.

 Much like Halloween, these days have traditionally been used for all sorts of prophesies and oracles.

As children, we would brn a massive Jule Log in the fireplace to make sre, we got enough light and warmth throughout the following year. Roasting nuts to see whose would crack open first (this person would marry first, don't ask if that came tre, I guess the outcome was different each and every year) and perform the typical oracles using lead or candle wax, with boards, lucky letters and other games.

 

When I learned to lay the cards, it was sch a game-changer. All of a sudden, I was able to make comprehensive, structured and nderstandable predictions, instead of staring at a strangely shaped piece of lead and guessing what it might represent.

You, too, can do this, even as a beginner.

Madame Lenormand Cards are simple and easy enough to allow anybody possessing a little empathy to read the cards to friends and family.

The system featured in our e-books is so simple and eay to understand, even after just a few days of practice, you can make simple statements. The more time you invest, the more elaborate your spreads and readings can be.

We are currently working on an online-based correspondence course, which will allow you to personally whenever you face difficulties and also have your homework corrected and possible mistakes explained.

Take the chance and become acquainted with our fool-proof system before new year's eve, and you will a special discount. Or buy any three e-books from our selection and receive the cheapest one completely free of charge! Just make sure you submit these special December-orders via email, or use our contact form!

 

Before I leave, let me ask you to leave a comment below: What do you do around New Year's Eve? Do you do any typical oracle games like table turning, cartomancy, etc?

I would love to know what your traditions are!